Barford housing site approved despite speeding fears

Land where houses will be built. Map data: Copyright 2015 Google. Imagery: Copyright 2015 Infoterra Ltd & Bluesky 2015
Land where houses will be built. Map data: Copyright 2015 Google. Imagery: Copyright 2015 Infoterra Ltd & Bluesky 2015
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Plans for 26 new houses in Barford have been given the green light by Warwick District Council despite fears over the risk of accidents due to speeding motorists.

The site, located on land west of Bridge Street and Wilkins Close, will be accessed on the western side of Bridge Street, prompting fears that speeding cars coming southbound over the bridge could shunt cars positioning to turn right into the site due to the slight bend to the north of the junction.

However, after visiting the site, officers on the Highway Authority concluded that there were no reasons for refusing planning permission, adding that the plans will have a minimal impact on road safety.

The planning committee approved the plans by seven votes to four after five speakers argued against the proposal.

Among the speakers was Cllr Peter Phillips, who had been in favour of the plans but changed his mind after studying them in greater detail.

He said: “The more I looked at it the more I came to the conclusion that this is a flawed and inappropriate proposal.”

Roderick Scott, speaking on behalf of the Barford Residents’ Association, said councillors should take into account the quantity of vehicles waiting to turn and adverse weather conditions such as wet roads that may affect braking distances.

After the speakers had finished, Cllr Gordon Cain expressed his concern over the potential danger of the junction and advised councillors to reject the proposal.

Additonally, Cllr Terry Morris spelled out a scenario where a car preparing to turn right could be shunted into oncoming traffic heading northbound if hit by a speeding car that failed to brake in time.

But Cllr Martyn Ashford thought the plans had to be approved on an objective basis.

He said: “It is with a heavy heart that I can’t justifiably say ‘there’s nothing wrong with this.’

Work on the site is expected to start in three years’ time.