Reasons why popular Derek was ‘top flight’

Well-knonw Cubbington resident and RAF Association member Derek Winbush passed away recently and his funeral was held at St Mary's church in Cubbington on Friday.

Well-knonw Cubbington resident and RAF Association member Derek Winbush passed away recently and his funeral was held at St Mary's church in Cubbington on Friday.

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HUNDREDS of people turned out in Cubbington last Friday to say farewell to a popular villager who gave his all in everything he did.

St Mary’s church held a celebration of the life of Derek William Winbush, who died aged 77 on Monday September 26.

Many of those who came to the celebration were members of the Oddfellows Friendly Society, with which Mr Winbush was enthusiastically involved over the years, while his fellow representatives of the Leamington and Warwick RAF Association held a guard of honour in tribute to the tireless fundraising work he had done.

The society’s brass band, for which Mr Winbush played a role in forming, played both at the service and the wake afterwards while his son-in-law Mark Payne read a moving tribute.

Mr Payne said: “Derek often used the expression ‘top flight’ when referring to someone or something that was the best there could be - maybe someone who was at the top of their chosen profession or a cut above the rest.

“Derek William Winbush was top flight.”

Mr Winbush was born on May 8 1934 and in his early years became known as ‘Lightning’ for the speed at which he would complete his newspaper rounds around parts of Leamington on his bicycle.

In 1950 Mr Winbush started his first full-time job as a stock records clerk at John Trelawny Ltd in Holly Walk.

It was there he met his future wife Margaret Draper, with whom he lived in Price Road, Cubbington, for many years and it was there they raised their daughter Suzanne.

The couple celebrated their golden wedding anniversary in 2006.

Before they married Mr Winbush was called up for compulsory service in the RAF, with which he was a corporal in pay accounts for three years.

He had many happy memories of his time with the air force but his real passion was for his membership of the Oddfellows Society.

Known in the society as a man who got on and made things happen, Mr Winbush organised events which included train journeys, coach trips and even cruise holidays.

An Aston Villa supporter, Mr Winbush had several other interests, hobbies and favourite pastimes including model trains, singing, playing the accordion and reciting limericks.

His grandchildren, Robert and Amy, were his pride and joy and he shared his love of trains with them by taking them on trips on the Ffestiniog Railway in North Wales.

Mr Payne said his father-in-law was a special man and a gentleman, who was a good friend to many people.

He added: “He enjoyed life and leaves many happy memories behind.”