Almost a third of reported crime not investigated fully by Warwickshire Police, programme claims

A Channel 4 documentary claimed that almost a third of all crime reported to Warwickshire Police is not followed up.
A Channel 4 documentary claimed that almost a third of all crime reported to Warwickshire Police is not followed up.

A Channel 4 documentary has claimed Warwickshire Police does not fully investigate around a third of all reported crime.

The episode of investigative show Dispatches broadcast yesterday evening (Monday October 8), entitled 'Lawless Britain: Where Are The Police?', examined every police force in England and Wales to see how crimes were being investigated by each of them.

The episode claimed that 27 per cent of all crime reported nationally was 'screened out' - meaning it was logged and reported, but not followed up.

And Warwickshire Police's figures were worse than the the national average.

The programme claimed Warwickshire Police screened out 32.89 per cent of all reported crime in 2017.

It also claimed that Warwickshire dropped just over a quarter of all 'violence with injury' cases last year - 26.02 per cent. The national average for this was just over 10 per cent.

In response to the programme, Chief Superintendent David Gardner from Warwickshire Police said even if certain cases were screened out, they could be reopened.

He added: "Every offence reported to us is assessed for the potential threat, harm and risk to the public and property. Resources are then allocated appropriately based on demand.

"Whilst we strive to provide the best possible level of service to our communities, there are instances where police may choose not to investigate lower level cases where there isn’t a prospect of a criminal justice outcome and the time spent on the investigation would not be proportionate.

"However, if further evidence later becomes available in relation to an offence, the investigation can be rescreened and may be reopened."

And Philip Seccombe, Warwickshire's Police and Crime Commissioner, said he understood people's concerns over the figures.

He added: "I can assure them that part of my role in holding the force to account involves ensuring that resources are being used effectively to tackle the issues and crimes that mean most to our communities.

"All offences reported are given proper consideration so that the appropriate response can be put in place.

"I know the force does have to prioritise its resources and sometimes has to take decisions on what action to take based on available evidence and likely outcomes.

"However, I will be seeking further assurances about how these decisions are made to ensure that no matters are dismissed when there are opportunities to progress and resolve them to protect our communities."